In response to the Fallout hype.

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Panic
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In response to the Fallout hype.

Post by Panic » 06/04/15

Following the hype of the recent announcement of Fallout 4, I have decided to make an archive of the Fallout games up to date. This is as much a hope to capture people into the series as provide entertainment for hours to come. Each folder contains the game itself as well as fix it mods and the likes. There are plenty more if you wish to look for it. I wish you a successful trek survivor.

Fallout is a series of post-apocalyptic role-playing video games. It was created by Interplay Entertainment. Although the series is set during the 22nd and 23rd centuries, its retro-futuristic setting and artwork are influenced by the post-war culture of 1950s America, and its combination of hope for the promises of technology and lurking fear of nuclear annihilation. A forerunner for Fallout is Wasteland, a 1988 video game of which the Fallout series is regarded to be a spiritual successor. Although the game worlds are different, the background story, inhabitants, locations, and characters draw many parallels.

The first two titles in the series (Fallout and Fallout 2) were developed by Black Isle Studios. Micro Forté and 14 Degrees East's 2001 Fallout Tactics: Brotherhood of Steel is a tactical role-playing game. In 2004, Interplay closed Black Isle Studios, and continued to produce an action game with RPG elements for the PlayStation 2 and Xbox, Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel without Black Isle Studios. A third entry in the main series, Fallout 3, was released in 2008 by Bethesda Softworks. The next role-playing installment of the series, Fallout: New Vegas, came out in 2010 and was developed by Obsidian Entertainment. The newest game in the series, Fallout 4, was announced on June 3, 2015.

Bethesda Softworks now owns the rights to produce all Fallout games.

Fallout (1997)
Released in 1997, Fallout takes place in a post-apocalyptic Southern California, beginning in the year 2161. The protagonist, named the Vault Dweller, is tasked with recovering a water chip in the Wasteland to replace the broken one in his or her underground shelter home, Vault 13. Afterwards, the Vault Dweller must then thwart the plans of a group of mutants, led by a grotesque entity named the Master. Fallout was originally intended to run under the GURPS role-playing game system. However, a disagreement with the creator of GURPS, Steve Jackson, over the game's violent content required Black Isle Studios to develop a new system, the SPECIAL. Fallout's atmosphere and artwork are reminiscent of post-WWII America and the nuclear paranoia that was widespread at that time.

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Fallout 2 (1998)
Fallout 2 was released in 1998, with several improvements over the first game, including an improved game engine, the ability to set attitudes of non-player character (NPC) party members and the ability to push people who are blocking doors. Additional features included several changes to the game world, including significantly more pop culture jokes and parodies, such as multiple Monty Python-referencing special random encounters, and self-parodying dialogue that broke the fourth wall to mention game mechanics. Fallout 2 takes place eighty years after Fallout, and centers around a descendant of the Vault-Dweller, the protagonist of Fallout. The player assumes the role of the Chosen One as he tries to save his village, Arroyo, from severe famine and droughts. After saving the village, the Chosen One must save it again, this time from the Enclave, the remnants of the pre-war United States Government.

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Fallout Tactics: Brotherhood of Steel (2001)
Tactics is the first Fallout game not to require the player to fight in a turn-based mode, and it is also the first to allow the player to customize the skills, perks, and combat actions of the rest of the party. Fallout Tactics focuses on tactical combat rather than role-playing; the new combat system included different modes, stances, and modifiers, but the player had no dialogue options. Most of the criticisms of the game came from its incompatibility with the story of the original two games, not from its gameplay. Fallout: Tactics includes a multiplayer mode that allows players to compete against squads of other characters controlled by other players. Unlike the previous two games, which are based in California, Fallout: Tactics takes place in the Midwestern United States. The game was released in early 2001 to generally favorable reviews.

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Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel (2004)
Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel became the first Fallout game for consoles when it was released in 2004. It follows an initiate in the Brotherhood of Steel who is given a suicidal quest to find several lost Brotherhood Paladins. BoS is an action role-playing game, representing a significant break from previous incarnations of the Fallout series in both gameplay and aesthetics. The game does not feature non-player characters that accompany the player in combat and uses heavy metal music, including Slipknot, Devin Townsend, and Killswitch Engage, which stands in contrast to the music of Fallout 3, performed by The Ink Spots and Louis Armstrong. It was the last Fallout game to be developed by Interplay.

Fallout 3 (2008)
Fallout 3 was developed by Bethesda Game Studios and released on October 28, 2008. The story picks up thirty years after the setting of Fallout 2 and 200 years after the nuclear war that devastated the game's world. The player is a Vault-dweller in Vault 101 who is forced to flee when the Overseer tries to arrest him/her in response to the player's father leaving the Vault. Once free, the player is dubbed the Lone Wanderer and ventures into the Wasteland in and around Washington, D.C., known as the Capital Wasteland, to find his/her father. It differs from previous games in the series by utilizing 3D graphics, a free-roam gaming world, and real-time combat, in contrast to previous games' 2D isometric graphics and turn-based combat. It was developed simultaneously for the PC, Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 using the Gamebryo engine. On release it received highly positive reviews, garnering 94/100, 92/100, and 93/100 averages scores on Metacritic for the PC, PS3 and Xbox 360 versions of the game, respectively. It won IGN's 2008 Overall Game of the Year Award, Xbox 360 Game of the Year, Best RPG, and Best Use of Sound, as well as E3's Best of the Show and Best Role Playing Game.

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Fallout: New Vegas (2010)
Fallout: New Vegas was developed by Obsidian Entertainment and released on October 19, 2010. The development team included developers who previously worked on Fallout and Fallout 2. Fallout: New Vegas is not a direct sequel to Fallout 3; rather, it is a stand-alone product. Events in the game follow four years after Fallout 3 and offer a similar role-playing experience, but no characters from that game appear. The player assumes the role of a courier in the post-apocalyptic world of the Mojave Wasteland. As the game begins, the Courier is shot in the head and left for dead shortly before being found and brought to a doctor in the nearby town of Goodsprings, marking the start of the game and the Courier's search for his or her would-be murderer. The city of New Vegas is a post-apocalyptic interpretation of Las Vegas with only three standing casinos; "Gomorrah", "The Tops" and "Ultra-Luxe", while the "Lucky 38" is a shell of a casino with a major plot.

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Duvessa
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Re: In response to the Fallout hype.

Post by Duvessa » 06/10/15

In response to two reports I have received, I have I have pulled some links attached to this post which were to an archive of these games. I did this, despite a kind of... dubious feeling about it. We watch pirated movies, listen to pirated music, but have issues with downloads of games all past their release shelf life?

While, yes... illegal on some level, I'm left with an uneasy feeling about a double standard in doing so, since so much of the content so many of us consume every day is dubiously legal, and often completely illegal. I've erred on the side of the law, and pulled the links, but left the valuable informational content in the post.

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