Ask A Science Question!

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Lyah
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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Lyah » 02/04/14

Next!

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Psia » 02/05/14

What was Kiri-kin-tha's first law of metaphysics?
"The food is good, the wine is excellent, the staff timely. All that is lacking is your company." - EQ2 Raven Mythic FAQ

"Let me tell you something. Don't. Don't let them promote you. Don't let them transfer you, don't let them do anything that takes you off the bridge of that ship, because while you're there, you can make a difference." - Kirk to Picard, Star Trek Generations

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Shizouka » 02/05/14

Nothing unreal exists.


....from memory even.

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Shizouka » 02/12/14

Here is a tricky question, one I don't know if anyone has any insight on. It might be something to ask an actual astrophysicist.

The Hubble Deep Field shows us images of thousands of thousands of galaxies and star systems out to around 13 billion years distant. These are many enormous galactic structures holding trillions of stars. Amazingly awe inspiring.

We also know that there are a lot of ideas about the structure of our universe, how space is expanding, weither it will contract or disperse out into nothingness. The current science suggests it might not contract again, but spread out infinitely.

Though, the thoughts that occupy me here, could some of these images of stars and galaxies be reflections of other stars and galaxies, many billion years distant in the past? Could there be a possibility that on the peripheries of our universe, light is warped back around, madly faint, but still holding images of some of these ancient stellar structures?

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Lyah » 02/12/14

Well, I think the chances of that are unlikely... anything that would be a reflection would have a noticeably reversed Doppler shift, for one thing. Also, a curved reflection would come back with a characterize-able distortion that would be detectable. I think those would be the two most detectable signs of reflected light.

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Shizouka » 02/13/14

That is the thing, I'm not sure you would get those if it is the fabric of space that that is curved in on itself. Light would just unwittingly continue to move, blissfully unaware.

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Lyah » 02/13/14

Shizouka wrote:That is the thing, I'm not sure you would get those if it is the fabric of space that that is curved in on itself. Light would just unwittingly continue to move, blissfully unaware.
I'm really not sure what you're getting at, or how you are picturing this. Let me sum up the way the universe as we understand it is, and then maybe you can better explain what your theory is:

We actually live in a universe of 4 spatial dimensions, it's just that you don't notice this 4th dimension of spacetime, because it's only visible on a massive scale. Think of our normal 3D universe as being stretched on balloon. That balloon is the 4th dimension of spacetime. Now fill that balloon with a bunch of dots to represent galaxies.

As the balloon expands, every dot moves away from every other dot. There is no "center of the universe" because the universe has no center. No matter what galaxy you look at, they are ALL receding from us, as if we had made some galactic faux paux. But, the same thing would happen no matter where in the universe you position yourself. Every galaxy is receding away from every other galaxy, just like the dots on a balloon are all expanding away from each other as you inflate the balloon.

Your idea of some of the images of the Hubble Deep Field being "reflections" doesn't quite jibe with me, because I can't envision what you're seeing as causing this light to reflect back. But... since all legitimate light sources are moving away from us, we'd definitely notice any reflections moving towards us because of the inverted doppler shift.

Likewise, if light were somehow traversing the balloon such that it was warping all the way around from the other side, that light would still give the impression of an object coming towards us instead of away like we expect, and give itself away in the form of a doppler shift inversion.

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Sairina » 02/14/14

How is it the owl do?

>.>

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Lyah » 02/14/14

Sairina wrote:How is it the owl do?

>.>
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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Kirath » 02/14/14


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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Lyah » 02/14/14

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Sairina » 03/05/14

^^

Finally someone gets to True Facts about The Owl.


Remember kids, don't do drugs! An owl may just rip your face off.

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Lyah » 03/06/14

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Zilvrae » 03/07/14

I'd like to revisit Shizouka's question, as I think I do have a visualization of it.

Let's go back to the analogy of a balloon covered in galaxies. Now imagine there's a drop of water inside the balloon. If you swirl the balloon, the drop of water will race around the inside surface of the balloon in circles.

Now zoom in to the perspective of the water drop. As far as it is concerned, it is traveling nonstop along a continual path. As it never bounces off anything, there is no distortion from reflection.

From the perspective of any of the galaxies on the balloon, they see a seemingly infinite number of water drops passing them, and might wonder where all these water drops are coming from (if a spot on a balloon were capable of abstract thought).

Only from the perspective of the person swirling the balloon is it obvious there's only one drop and it's going around in a circle.

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Lyah » 03/07/14

Except, in reality, nothing can be inside the balloon, and anything circumnavigating the outside would take longer to make the trip than the universe is old. So, would not happen.

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Scrappers » 03/11/14

Personally, I believe the universe is 11 dimensions, with each higher dimension being at a right angle to the previous one, and the possibility of a multi-verse.

(M Theory)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-theory

If you take about a year(s) or so to draw it out and play with the math, it really makes sense. At least it does to me, but that should probably worry you. :P

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Zilvrae » 03/11/14

I'd get lost in the 8th or 9th dimension maybe. 8th or 9th. Probably.

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Lyah » 03/11/14

I remember a video out there that tried to explain the universe, and the multiverse, in the context of an 11-dimensional theory, with each of the higher dimensions being another branch in the multiverse world-tree. I'm not going to link to the video, because, while it does neatly explain the number of alternate paths it takes to create a multiverse, that has nothing at all to do with the multiple dimensions of string theory.

The dimensions above spacetime are mostly commonly thought of not at right angles to our present four-dimensional universe, but as infitenimesally small dimensions bundled up under our present dimensions, and so small as to be nearly undetectable.

The extra dimensions of superstring resolve some issues that it gets very hard to easily explain, but are necessary satisfy something called a "Conformal anomaly" that crops up in quantum physics. Some solutions to, called bosonic solutions, even require up to 26 dimensions! However, this has fallen out of favor with simpler theories that require no more than 10, or 11 dimensions.

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Scrappers » 03/11/14

Personally I don't think I could live with 26 dimensions. My head nearly esploded understanding the 11. :P

And you are correct, the right angles is far from accurate, but it is the easiest way to grasp the concept of higher than 4 dimensions. Really they're more like folded up little doodad thingies. (technical term) :wink:

This probably esplains it better.

Image

Or perhaps this if you have time to read it.
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/physics/i ... sions.html

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Lyah
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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Lyah » 03/12/14

One way to think about "dimensions" in science to is to use the same concept borrowed from fractal dimensions.

Imaging you're looking at a dot. 1 dimension. Then you zoom in, and it's a circle, two dimensions. Zoom in some more, and it's a sphere, 3, then zoom in again, and the 3 dimensional sphere is composed of strings, which look like two dimensional squiggly lines, and so on....

Dimensionality in physics can sometimes be thought of in that manner. Dimensionality can also explain some things like seemingly "massless" photons. Where's the mass - in another dimension, which is why we can't measure it.

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Tregarde » 03/12/14

Actual questions:

Many plugs for electrical devices can only fit in a socket one way - why is that?

Related - some plugs have three prongs. I know the third prong is a ground, but why is a ground needed? Why do only some plugs have a ground?

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Scrappers » 03/12/14

The third prong is an earth ground, usually connected to the inside of a metal case. That way, if there is a short, it goes through that earth ground, blows a fuse, or trips a breaker, etc. and doesn't kill you. :-)

Some two pronged plugs are polarized. i.e. one side is slightly larger than the other so that you can only plug them in one particular way. This is done so that when you turn the switch off it will actually de-energize the circuit instead of just stopping the device from working.

So basically it's to keep you from getting fried when somethin goes wrong. :)

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Lyah » 03/13/14

Watching Alien tonight, someone wondered if future spaceships will really have a self destruct?

I’m sure they will, because they do right now! Back to the beginning of NASA’s earliest rocket experiments, all spacecraft have had the ability to self destruct, and for a good reason, too! If a spacecraft is out of control, and headed for a populated area, the “Range Safety Officer” in Mission Control can remotely detonate explosives to destroy the rocket. This can be useful in stopping a rogue spacecraft before it even gets a chance to get close to a point where it could cause loss of life and property.

Perhaps the saddest example of this happened during the Challenger Disaster. When the Space Shuttle and it’s liquid fuel tank exploded, killing the seven astronauts aboard, Challenger twin SRBs (Solid Rocket Boosters) were still running. It was the Range Safety Officer who remotely detonated them, causing them to explode harmlessly out at sea. This is an actual control panel used by the RSO:

Image


It should be noted that while the SRBs had self-destruct modules, the Space Shuttle itself did not have it’s own self-destruct system. This was fine for a number of reasons. Once the SRBs separated from the shuttle, it would most likely either be free to ditch/crash harmlessly in the ocean, or to make a partial orbit around the earth, and land back at Edwards Air Force base in California, or a number of other emergency abort landing strips, or even attempt a water landing.

The Range Safety Officer bears a terrible responsibility. With only seconds to act in the event of a disaster, he has to decide weather to detonate explosives that could kill human beings, or destroy hundreds of millions of dollar of space hardware. I’d give anything to work Mission Control for NASA, but I think this is one job I’d pass on. Such responsibility is a terrible privilege.

NASA’s next space vehicles will include a rocket-powered escape pod for launch emergencies.

Image

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Re: Ask A Science Question!

Post by Scrappers » 03/13/14

Addendum to the discussion about plugs and electricity.

Wiring colors and what they mean and what goes where and why.

https://www.doityourself.com/stry/220-w ... yH3B9uDCbk

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